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  • A History of Art for Beginners Quick View
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    • A History of Art for Beginners Quick View
    • A History of Art for Beginners
    • A History of Art for Beginners is written by Clara Erskine Clement Waters. The fine arts are Architecture, Sculpture, Painting, Poetry, and Music, and though we could live if none of these existed, yet life would be far from the pleasant experience that it is often made to be through the enjoyment of these arts.
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  • A Joy For Ever Quick View
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    • A Joy For Ever Quick View
    • A Joy For Ever
    • A Joy For Ever is written by John Ruskin. There is this great difference; it is precisely this difference on which I wish to fix your attention, for it is precisely this difference which you have to do away with. We know the necessity of authority in farm, or in fleet, or in army.
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  • A Pindarick Ode on Painting Quick View
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    • A Pindarick Ode on Painting Quick View
    • A Pindarick Ode on Painting
    • A Pindarick Ode on Painting is written by Thomas Morrison. The Society exists to make available inexpensive reprints (usually facsimile reproductions) of rare seventeenth and eighteenth century works. The editorial policy of the Society continues unchanged.
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  • Ariadne Florentina Quick View
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    • Ariadne Florentina Quick View
    • Ariadne Florentina
    • Ariadne Florentina is written by John Ruskin. The course, so far as it consists in practice, will be defined in my Instructions for the schools. And the theory connected with that practice is set down in the three lectures at the end of the first course I delivered--those on Line, Light, and Color.
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  • Artist and Public Quick View
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    • Artist and Public Quick View
    • Artist and Public
    • Artist and Public is written by Kenyon Cox. In the history of art, as in the history of politics and in the history of economics, our modern epoch is marked off from all preceding epochs by one great event, the French Revolution. Fragonard, who survived that Revolution to lose himself in a new and strange world, is the last at…
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  • Artists’ Wives Quick View
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    • Artists’ Wives Quick View
    • Artists’ Wives
    • Artists' Wives is written by Alphonse Daudet. The excitement of the meal had put her in a good humour. To cheer up the poet, to whom his mingled failure and glory were doubly painful, she thumped him on the back, laughed with her mouth full, saying in her hideous jargon, that it was not worth while for such a trifle…
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  • Belcaro Quick View
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    • Belcaro Quick View
    • Belcaro
    • Belcaro is written by Vernon Lee. "Vernon Lee writes well about poetry, better upon painting and sculpture, and best upon music. The essay on 'Cherubino' is the finest in the book, and is a perfect gem in its way."
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  • British Museum in Four Visits Quick View
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    • British Museum in Four Visits Quick View
    • British Museum in Four Visits
    • British Museum in Four Visits is written by W. Blanchard Jerrold. The money to found a British Museum was raised by a lottery in the middle of the last century. Sir Hans Sloane having offered his books and museum of natural history to Parliament.
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  • Capitals Quick View
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    • Capitals Quick View
    • Capitals
    • Capitals is written by Frederick W. Hamilton. A capital letter is a letter of formal shape. Capitals were originally derived from the stiff and angular letters used in formal inscriptions. Originally all writing was done in capitals. Later the scribes devised less formal shapes for the letters.
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  • Cathedral Cities of England Quick View
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    • Cathedral Cities of England Quick View
    • Cathedral Cities of England
    • Cathedral Cities of England is written by George Gilbert. In the following accounts of the Cathedral Cities of England, technical architectural terms will necessarily appear, and to the end that they should be comprehensive, I give here a slight sketch of the origin of the various forms, and the reasons for their naming, together with dates.
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  • Cathedrals of Northern Spain Quick View
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    • Cathedrals of Northern Spain Quick View
    • Cathedrals of Northern Spain
    • Cathedrals of Northern Spain is written by Charles Rudy. The Romans were the first to come to Spain with a view to conquering the land, and to organizing the half-savage clans or tribes who roamed through the thickets and across the plains. But nowhere did the great rulers of the world encounter such fierce resistance. The clans were extremely warlike…
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  • Cathedrals of Spain Quick View
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    • Cathedrals of Spain Quick View
    • Cathedrals of Spain
    • Cathedrals of Spain is written by John A. Gade. In the last dozen years many English books on Spain have appeared. They have dealt with their subject from the point of view of the artist or the historian, the archeologist, the politician, or the mere sight-seer.
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  • Concerning the Spiritual in Art Quick View
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    • Concerning the Spiritual in Art Quick View
    • Concerning the Spiritual in Art
    • Concerning the Spiritual in Art is written by Wassily Kandinsky. It is no common thing to find an artist who, even if he be willing to try, is capable of expressing his aims and ideals with any clearness and moderation. Some people will say that any such capacity is a flaw in the perfect artist, who should find his expression…
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  • Cornwall Quick View
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    • Cornwall Quick View
    • Cornwall
    • Cornwall is written by Geraldine Edith Mitton. To the mind of the ordinary Briton there is a curious attraction in "getting as far as you can"--a streak in mentality which has accounted in no small degree for the world-wide Empire. In England you cannot in one direction get any farther than the extreme point of Cornwall.
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  • dot-font: Talking About Design Quick View
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    • dot-font: Talking About Design Quick View
    • dot-font: Talking About Design
    • dot-font: Talking About Design is written by John D. Berry. The design draws attention to itself, with its color blocks setting off the margins from the body of the text, but once you get used to it, it works well enough.
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  • Essays on Art Quick View
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    • Essays on Art Quick View
    • Essays on Art
    • Essays on Art is written by Arthur Clutton-Brock. These essays, reprinted from the Times Literary Supplement with a few additions and corrections, are not all entirely or directly concerned with art; but even the last one--Waste or Creation?--does bear on the question, How are we to improve the art of our own time.
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  • Field’s Chromatography Quick View
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    • Field’s Chromatography Quick View
    • Field’s Chromatography
    • Field's Chromatography is written by George Field. How early, and to what extent, colouring may have attained the rank of science among the ancients, are questions not easily set at rest; but that some progress had been made, even at a very remote period, is proved by the magnificent tombs of the Egyptian kings at Thebes.
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  • Forty Years of ‘Spy’ Quick View
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    • Forty Years of ‘Spy’ Quick View
    • Forty Years of ‘Spy’
    • Forty Years of 'Spy' is written by Leslie Ward. In the course of our lives the monotonous repetition of daily routine and the similarity of the types we meet make our minds less and less susceptible to impressions, with the result that important events and interesting rencontres of last year.
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  • Fra Angelico Quick View
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    • Fra Angelico Quick View
    • Fra Angelico
    • Fra Angelico is written by Jennie Ellis Keysor. It is a body of such men on the heights of Fiesole that interests us. They are Dominican monks, of the order of great preachers, founded long ago by St. Dominic. Over long white robes the brothers, or frates, as they are called, wear black capes and back from their tonsured heads…
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  • Fra Bartolommeo Quick View
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    • Fra Bartolommeo Quick View
    • Fra Bartolommeo
    • Fra Bartolommeo is written by Leader Scott. Fra Bartolommeo and Albertinelli are little known in this country. Practically nothing has been written about them and very few of their works are in either public galleries or private collections.
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  • French Art Quick View
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    • French Art Quick View
    • French Art
    • French Art is written by W. C. Brownell. The situation had its advantages as well as its drawbacks, certainly. It saved French painting an immense amount of fumbling, of laborious experimentation, of crudity, of failure. But it stamped it with an essential artificiality from which it did not fully recover for over two hundred years, until, insensibly, it had built…
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  • Frondes Agrestes Quick View
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    • Frondes Agrestes Quick View
    • Frondes Agrestes
    • Frondes Agrestes is written by John Ruskin. I have been often asked to republish the first book of mine which the public noticed, and which, hitherto, remains their favourite, in a more easily attainable form than that of its existing editions. I am, however, resolved never to republish the book as a whole.
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  • Great Artists Quick View
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    • Great Artists Quick View
    • Great Artists
    • Great Artists is written by Jennie Ellis Keysor. We are about to study Raphael, the most generally praised, the most beautiful, and certainly the most loved of all the painters of the world. When all these delightful things can be truthfully said of one man, surely we may look forward with pleasure to a detailed study of his life and…
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  • His Masterpiece Quick View
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    • His Masterpiece Quick View
    • His Masterpiece
    • His Masterpiece is written by Émile Zola. I had just a slight acquaintance with Manet, whose studio I first visited early in my youth, and though the exigencies of life led me long ago to cast aside all artistic ambition of my own, I have been for more than thirty years on friendly terms with members of the French art…
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  • Holbein Quick View
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    • Holbein Quick View
    • Holbein
    • Holbein is written by Beatrice Fortescue. The eighty-three years stretching from 1461 to 1543--between the probable year of the elder Hans Holbein's birth and that in which the younger, the great Holbein, died--constitute one of those periods which rightly deserve the much-abused name of an Epoch.
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  • Homes of the Great Quick View
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    • Homes of the Great Quick View
    • Homes of the Great
    • Homes of the Great is written by Elbert Hubbard. The immaculate conception of love and the miracle of birth are recurring themes in the symphony of life. Love, religion and art have ever walked and ever will walk hand in hand. Art is the expression of man's joy in his work; and art.
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  • How to See the British Museum Quick View
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    • How to See the British Museum Quick View
    • How to See the British Museum
    • How to See the British Museum is written by W. Blanchard Jerrold. These regulations secured the exclusive attendance of the upper classes. The libraries were hoarded for the particular enjoyment of the worm, whose feast was only at rare intervals disturbed by some student regardless of difficulties.
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  • Illuminated Manuscripts Quick View
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    • Illuminated Manuscripts Quick View
    • Illuminated Manuscripts
    • Illuminated Manuscripts is written by John W. Bradley. What is meant by art?--The art faculty--How artists may be compared--The aim of illumination--Distinction between illumination and miniature--Definition of illumination--The first miniature painter--Origin of the term "miniature"--Ovid's allusion to his little book.
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  • Laws of Japanese Painting Quick View
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    • Laws of Japanese Painting Quick View
    • Laws of Japanese Painting
    • Laws of Japanese Painting is written by Henry P. Bowie. It was as though the skies had opened to disclose a new kingdom of art. Taking his brush in hand, with a few strokes he had executed a masterpiece, a loquot branch, with leaves clustering round the ripe fruit.
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  • Lectures on Art Quick View
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    • Lectures on Art Quick View
    • Lectures on Art
    • Lectures on Art is written by John Ruskin. The following lectures were the most important piece of my literary work done with unabated power, best motive, and happiest concurrence of circumstance. They were written and delivered while my mother yet lived, and had vividest sympathy in all I was attempting.
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  • Lectures on Landscape Quick View
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    • Lectures on Landscape Quick View
    • Lectures on Landscape
    • Lectures on Landscape is written by John Ruskin. Had this scene been in America, no mortal could have made a landscape of it. It is nothing but a grass bank with some not very pretty trees scattered over it, wholly without grouping. The stream at the bottom is rocky indeed, but its rocks are mean, flat, and of a dull…
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  • Leonardo da Vinci Quick View
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    • Leonardo da Vinci Quick View
    • Leonardo da Vinci
    • Leonardo da Vinci is written by Sigmund Freud. It is quite possible that the conception of a beaming jovial and happy Leonardo was true only for the first and longer period of the master's life. From now on, when the downfall of the rule of Lodovico Moro forced him to leave Milan, his sphere of action and his assured position.
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  • Letters to Helen Quick View
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    • Letters to Helen Quick View
    • Letters to Helen
    • Letters to Helen is written by Keith Henderson. After moving off at midnight from among the Hampshire pine-trees, we eventually reached our port of departure. Great fun detraining the horses and getting them on board. The men were in the highest spirits. But how disgusting those cold rank smells of a dock are.
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  • Lives of the Most Eminent Painters Quick View
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    • Lives of the Most Eminent Painters Quick View
    • Lives of the Most Eminent Painters
    • Lives of the Most Eminent Painters is written by Giorgio Vasari. This never happens to painters, for the reason that at every slip of the brush or error of judgment that might befall them they have time, recognizing it themselves or being told by others.
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  • Michelangelo Quick View
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    • Michelangelo Quick View
    • Michelangelo
    • Michelangelo is written by Romain Rolland. The life of Michelangelo offers one of the most striking examples of the influence that a great man can have on his time. At the moment of his birth in the second half of the fifteenth century the serenity of Ghirlandajo and of Bramante illuminated Italian art.
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  • Modern Painters Quick View
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    • Modern Painters Quick View
    • Modern Painters
    • Modern Painters is written by John Ruskin. The work now laid before the public originated in indignation at the shallow and false criticism of the periodicals of the day on the works of the great living artist to whom it principally refers. It was intended to be a short pamphlet, reprobating the matter and style of those critiques, and pointing…
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  • Modern Painting Quick View
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    • Modern Painting Quick View
    • Modern Painting
    • Modern Painting is written by George Moore. The painter seized one of those moments, and called it into our consciousness as a musician with certain finger will choose to give prominence to a certain note in a chord.
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  • On the Old Road Quick View
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    • On the Old Road Quick View
    • On the Old Road
    • On the Old Road is written by John Ruskin. The less direct influences of external nature in the two countries were still more opposed. The sense of beauty, which among the Greek peninsulas was fostered by beating of sea and rush of river.
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  • Perugino Quick View
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    • Perugino Quick View
    • Perugino
    • Perugino is written by Selwyn Brinton. These are the influences which were to stream upon the young Pietro as an eager and industrious student--some among them of course indirectly, but others no doubt very directly and immediately. Vasari's account, which is still of first value save where it is opposed by stronger evidence, is that he was sent as a…
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  • Prehistoric Textile Art Quick View
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    • Prehistoric Textile Art Quick View
    • Prehistoric Textile Art
    • Prehistoric Textile Art is written by William H. Holmes. The sizes of mats were greatly varied; the smallest were sufficient for seating only a single person, but the largest were many yards in length, the width being restricted to a few feet by the conditions of construction.
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  • Promenades of an Impressionist Quick View
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    • Promenades of an Impressionist Quick View
    • Promenades of an Impressionist
    • Promenades of an Impressionist is written by James Huneker. Think of Bouguereau and you have his antithesis in Cézanne--Cézanne whose stark figures of bathers, male and female, evoke a shuddering sense of the bestial. Not that there is offence intended in his badly huddled nudes; he only delineates in simple, naked fashion the horrors of some undressed humans.
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  • Rambles of an Archaeologist Quick View
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    • Rambles of an Archaeologist Quick View
    • Rambles of an Archaeologist
    • Rambles of an Archaeologist is written by Frederick William Fairholt. Long after the extinction of the practical art-power evolved from the master-minds of Greece and Rome, though rudely shattered by the northern tribes, it failed not to enforce from them an admission of its grandeur.
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  • Saint Ursula Quick View
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    • Saint Ursula Quick View
    • Saint Ursula
    • Saint Ursula is written by John Ruskin. It is in the desire of rescuing one of the choicest bits in all Fors that the present little booklet is offered to the clients of the "Celestial Lily" as Mother Church names the noble Martyr, St. Ursula. Though, of course, a life of this royal maiden has an interest for me apart…
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  • Six Centuries of Painting Quick View
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    • Six Centuries of Painting Quick View
    • Six Centuries of Painting
    • Six Centuries of Painting is written by Randall Davies. As it had begun in Italy, under the auspices of the Church, so it chiefly developed in that country; at first in Florence and Siena, later in Rome, whither its greatest masters were summoned by the Pope, and in Venice, where, farther from the ecclesiastical influence, it flourished more exuberantly, and…
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  • Stories Pictures Tell Quick View
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    • Stories Pictures Tell Quick View
    • Stories Pictures Tell
    • Stories Pictures Tell is written by Flora L. Carpenter. The smith is trying a shoe on the hind foot of the beautiful horse, but neither the man nor the horse seems quite satisfied with it. The horse has an anxious look in her intelligent eyes as she turns her head to watch the smith.
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  • The Arts and Crafts Movement Quick View
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    • The Arts and Crafts Movement Quick View
    • The Arts and Crafts Movement
    • The Arts and Crafts Movement is written by Thomas James Cobden-Sanderson. The Movement, passing under the name of 'Arts and Crafts,' admits of many definitions. It may be associated with the movement of ideas, characteristic of the close of the last century, and be defined to be an effort to bring it under the influence of art as the supreme…
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  • The Babylonian Legends Quick View
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    • The Babylonian Legends Quick View
    • The Babylonian Legends
    • The Babylonian Legends is written by British Museum. A perusal of the texts of the Seven Tablets of Creation, which King was enabled, through the information contained in them, to arrange for the first time in their proper sequence, shows that the main object of the Legend was the glorification of the god Marduk.
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  • The Best Portraits Quick View
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    • The Best Portraits Quick View
    • The Best Portraits
    • The Best Portraits is written by Charles Sumner. In any considerable collection, portraits occupy an important place. Their multitude may be inferred when I mention that, in one series of portfolios, in the Paris cabinet, I counted no less than forty-seven portraits of Franklin and forty-three of Lafayette.
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  • The Elements of Drawing Quick View
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    • The Elements of Drawing Quick View
    • The Elements of Drawing
    • The Elements of Drawing is written by John Ruskin. The temptation is always to be slovenly and careless, and the outline is like a bridle, and forces our indolence into attention and precision.
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  • The Ethics of the Dust Quick View
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    • The Ethics of the Dust Quick View
    • The Ethics of the Dust
    • The Ethics of the Dust is written by John Ruskin. The manner in which the poets and artists of antiquity have symbolized or personified Death, has excited considerable discussion; and the various opinions of Lessing, Herder, Klotz, and other controversialists have only tended to demonstrate that the ancients adopted many different modes to accomplish this purpose.
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  • The Great Painters’ Gospel Quick View
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    • The Great Painters’ Gospel Quick View
    • The Great Painters’ Gospel
    • The Great Painters' Gospel is written by Henry Turner Bailey. The words of the text take on a deeper meaning as they are studied in the light of this picture. Because Hofmann is an artist, a man gifted with imagination, he sees more clearly, more vividly than the average person.
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  • The House in Good Taste Quick View
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    • The House in Good Taste Quick View
    • The House in Good Taste
    • The House in Good Taste is written by Elsie de Wolfe. It is no longer possible, even to people of only faintly æsthetic tastes, to buy chairs merely to sit upon or a clock merely that it should tell the time. Home-makers are determined to have their houses, outside and in, correct according to the best standards.
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  • The Mind of the Artist Quick View
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    • The Mind of the Artist Quick View
    • The Mind of the Artist
    • The Mind of the Artist is written by Various Authors. It is always interesting and profitable to get the views of workmen on their work, and on the principles which guide them in it; and in bringing together these sayings of artists Mrs. Binyon has done a very useful thing. A great number of opinions are presented, which, in their…
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  • The Pagans Quick View
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    • The Pagans Quick View
    • The Pagans
    • The Pagans is written by Arlo Bates. Arthur Fenton, a slender young artist, with elegant figure and deep set eyes, was lounging in an easy chair in an attitude well calculated to show to advantage his graceful outlines. For occupation he was turning over a portfolio of sketches, whose authorship was indicated by the attitude of the lady seated near…
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  • The Sculpture and Mural Decorations Quick View
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    • The Sculpture and Mural Decorations Quick View
    • The Sculpture and Mural Decorations
    • The Sculpture and Mural Decorations is written by Stella G.S. Perry. The persistent necessity for creation is strikingly proved by the prolific output of the Arts. Year after year, as we whirl through space on our mysterious destiny, undeterred by apparent futility.
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  • The Seven Periods of English Architecture Quick View
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  • The Stones of Venice Quick View
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    • The Stones of Venice Quick View
    • The Stones of Venice
    • The Stones of Venice is written by John Ruskin. Thus much, however, it is necessary for the reader to know, that, when I planned the work, I had materials by me, collected at different times of sojourn in Venice during the last seventeen years, which it seemed to me might be arranged with little difficulty.
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  • The Two Paths Quick View
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    • The Two Paths Quick View
    • The Two Paths
    • The Two Paths is written by John Ruskin. The study, however, of the effect of art on the mind of nations is one rather for the historian than for us; at all events it is one for the discussion of which we have no more time this evening. But I will ask your patience with me while I try to…
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  • The Venetian School of Painting Quick View
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    • The Venetian School of Painting Quick View
    • The Venetian School of Painting
    • The Venetian School of Painting is written by Evelyn March Phillipps. Such a book does not pretend to vie with, much less to supersede, the masterly treatises on the subject which have from time to time appeared, or to take the place of exhaustive histories, such as that of Professor Leonello Venturi on the Italian primitives.
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  • The Works of William Hogarth Quick View
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    • The Works of William Hogarth Quick View
    • The Works of William Hogarth
    • The Works of William Hogarth is written by John Trusler. The history opens, representing a scene crowded with all the monuments of avarice, and laying before us a most beautiful contrast, such as is too general in the world, to pass unobserved.
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  • Thirteen Chapters of American History Quick View
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    • Thirteen Chapters of American History Quick View
    • Thirteen Chapters of American History
    • Thirteen Chapters of American History is written by Theodore Sutro. The Thirteen Paintings, to a history and description of which (and incidentally to a brief memoir of their creator, Edward Moran) these pages are devoted, are monumental in their character and importance.
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  • Under the Greenwood Tree Quick View
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    • Under the Greenwood Tree Quick View
    • Under the Greenwood Tree
    • Under the Greenwood Tree is written by Thomas Hardy. This story of the Mellstock Quire and its old established west- gallery musicians, with some supplementary descriptions of similar officials in Two on a Tower, A Few Crusted Characters, and other places, is intended to be a fairly true picture.
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  • Vigee Le Brun Quick View
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    • Vigee Le Brun Quick View
    • Vigee Le Brun
    • Vigee Le Brun is written by Haldane MacFall. Like François Boucher, the great painter to the king, Elizabeth Vigée came to the pretty business with the advantage of being an artist's child; like him, she received her first lessons at an early age from her father; and, like him, she moved from earliest childhood in an atmosphere of art and…
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  • Why Bewick Succeeded Quick View
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    • Why Bewick Succeeded Quick View
    • Why Bewick Succeeded
    • Why Bewick Succeeded is written by Jacob Kainen. "A little engraving on wood was also done, but Bewick tells us that his master was uncomfortable in this field and almost always turned it over to him. His training, obviously, was of a rough and ready sort, based upon serviceable but routine engraving on metal. There was no study of drawing,…
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  • Wood-Block Printing Quick View
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    • Wood-Block Printing Quick View
    • Wood-Block Printing
    • Wood-Block Printing is written by F. Morley Fletcher. In the first place, we wish to provide trustworthy text-books of workshop practice, from the points of view of experts who have critically examined the methods current in the shops, and putting aside vain survivals, are prepared to say what is good workmanship, and to set up a standard of quality in…
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